Located in the Pacific “Ring of Fire” on the Alaska Peninsula, Aniakchak is a six-mile wide, 2000-foot-deep caldera. 3500 years ago the top blew off leaving a relatively flat-floored bowl, which is now filled with small cinder cones, lava flows, pits and lakes. The caldera is on the left side of the image. Note that north is towards the upper right.

The Maps-Un-Natural™ series could also be called Psychedelic Maps. These are an effort to create a visually stunning and interesting image, usually with a limited color palette. The coloration varies only with elevation and often brings out notable landscape features.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.


Located 20 miles south of Bend, the Newberry Volcano and its lava flows cover a large area studded with cinder cones , obsidian domes, fissures, lava tubes and hot springs. Lava Butte, next to US 97, is at the upper-left-center. A series of nicely delineated lava flows are located on the west side of the image. Off the image to the southeast is the caldera itself, containing Paulina and East Lakes.

The Maps-Un-Natural™ series could also be called Psychedelic Maps. These are an effort to create a visually stunning and interesting image, usually with a limited color palette. The coloration varies only with elevation and often brings out notable landscape features.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.


Fjords are characterized by steep-sided mountains dropping precipitately into the sea. The U.S.-Canadian border zig-zags in Coast Range in the upper right of the image. In the center-left, the larger Lynn Canal splits into the western Chilkat Inlet and the eastern Chilkoot Inlet, with the city of Haines between them. The surrounding mountains are covered with glaciers.

The Maps-Un-Natural™ series could also be called Psychedelic Maps. These are an effort to create a visually stunning and interesting image, usually with a limited color palette. The coloration varies only with elevation and often brings out notable landscape features.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Card

Back of card text:
A source of inspiration . Learn about glaciers. Discover life in a rainforest. Hike the Wonderland Trail. Explore subalpine ecology. Watch clouds shroud the mountain and disappear. Visit a rustic historic building. Dream about climbing to the summit. Study geology. Experience a mountain meadow. Listen to a glacier crack.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of Mount Rainier National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm

Back of card text:
Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park displays the results of 70 million years of volcanism, migration, and evolution — processes that thrust a bare land from the sea and clothed it with unique ecosystems, and a distinct human culture. The park highlights two of the world’s most active volcanoes, and offers insights on the birth of the Hawaiian Islands and views of dramatic volcanic landscapes.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/havo/index.htm

Back of card text:
This special place vibrates with stories of ancient and modern Hawaiian culture and protects the bond between the land and its people. The park also cares for endangered species, some of which exist nowhere else. Come visit this special place – renew your spirit amid stark volcanic landscapes and sub-tropical rain forest with an unforgettable hike through the backcountry.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of Halekalā National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/hale/index.htm

Back of card text:
Crater Lake has inspired people for hundreds of years. No place else on earth combines a deep, pure lake, so blue in color; sheer surrounding cliffs, almost two thousand feet high; two picturesque islands; and a violent volcanic past. It is a place of immeasurable beauty, and an outstanding outdoor laboratory and classroom.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of Crater Lake National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/crla/index.htm


Mount Saint Helens is the youngest of the major Cascade volcanoes – its visible cone was formed entirely during the past 2,200 years. It was a stratovolcano, with steep sided, often symmetrical cones constructed of alternating layers of lava flows, ash, and other volcanic debris, which tend to erupt explosively. The volcano was intermittently active for at least a 26-year span from 1831 to 1857, and perhaps as early as 1800. In the weeks before March 27, 1980 earthquakes began to occur, and on that date Mount Saint Helens erupted, sending ash and steam 6,000 feet high. The side of the mountain collapsed and unleashed a northward debris avalanche and lateral blast that devastated an area of about 230 square miles. This image covers the remains of the volcano itself.


Maps-al-Fresco harken back to the days in cartography when plaster relief models were made, often for the purpose of wall or museum display, or to be photographed for a printed relief map background. Plain in appearance, they show the landscape in it’s simplest, greyscale form.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Monument information: http://www.fs.usda.gov/mountsthelens/


Mount Saint Helens is the youngest of the major Cascade volcanoes – its visible cone was formed entirely during the past 2,200 years. It was a stratovolcano, with steep sided, often symmetrical cones constructed of alternating layers of lava flows, ash, and other volcanic debris, which tend to erupt explosively. The volcano was intermittently active for at least a 26-year span from 1831 to 1857, and perhaps as early as 1800. In the weeks before March 27, 1980 earthquakes began to occur, and on that date Mount Saint Helens erupted, sending ash and steam 6,000 feet high. The side of the mountain collapsed and unleashed a northward debris avalanche and lateral blast that devastated an area of about 230 square miles. This image covers the remains of the volcano itself.


Maps-au-Naturel images eliminate the presence of man to show only the natural landscape. These maps are created to be more of an artistic approximation, a feeling, of a particular landscape, rather than an exact rendering of every detail. The actual topography and coloration of the terrain are researched and studied in maps, photos and satellite imagery, and then applied generally to the Maps-au-Naturel image.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Monument information: http://www.fs.usda.gov/mountsthelens/