The Palouse Hills are underlain by a basalt lava which was then scoured by a large flood about 20,000 years ago during the Great Ice Age. Since then, windblown silt and volcanic ash have covered the area, resulting in rich wheat-growing country. The Palouse River cuts through the image. Note that this image has south pointing up.

The Maps-Un-Natural™ series could also be called Psychedelic Maps. These are an effort to create a visually stunning and interesting image, usually with a limited color palette. The coloration varies only with elevation and often brings out notable landscape features.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.


At the end of the last ice age, large glacial outburst floods carved out canyons, or coulees, in the landscape, so this area in Central Washington became known as “ Coulee Country ”. Sun Lakes State Park is at the center, and Coulee City is in the upper right corner of the image.

The Maps-Un-Natural™ series could also be called Psychedelic Maps. These are an effort to create a visually stunning and interesting image, usually with a limited color palette. The coloration varies only with elevation and often brings out notable landscape features.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Park information:

Olympic National Park, Washington Card

Back of card text:
Here you will find Pacific Ocean beaches, rain forest valleys, glacier-capped peaks and a stunning variety of plants and animals. Roads provide access to the outer edges of the park, but the heart of Olympic is wilderness; a primeval sanctuary for humans and wild creatures alike.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of Olympic National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/olym/index.htm

North Cascades National Park, Washington Card

ORDER HERE

Back of card text:
Jagged peaks, deep valleys, cascading waterfalls, and over 300 glaciers adorn the North Cascades National Park Complex. Three park units in this mountainous region are managed as one and include North Cascades National Park, Ross Lake, and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of North Cascades National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/noca/index.htm

Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Card

Back of card text:
A source of inspiration . Learn about glaciers. Discover life in a rainforest. Hike the Wonderland Trail. Explore subalpine ecology. Watch clouds shroud the mountain and disappear. Visit a rustic historic building. Dream about climbing to the summit. Study geology. Experience a mountain meadow. Listen to a glacier crack.

Celebrate your favorite national park with one of these beautiful map cards of Mount Rainier National Park! They make excellent gifts as well as dispatches to friends and relatives. Made from official National Park Service maps, formatted to fit these nicely printed cards.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/mora/index.htm


Mount Saint Helens is the youngest of the major Cascade volcanoes – its visible cone was formed entirely during the past 2,200 years. It was a stratovolcano, with steep sided, often symmetrical cones constructed of alternating layers of lava flows, ash, and other volcanic debris, which tend to erupt explosively. The volcano was intermittently active for at least a 26-year span from 1831 to 1857, and perhaps as early as 1800. In the weeks before March 27, 1980 earthquakes began to occur, and on that date Mount Saint Helens erupted, sending ash and steam 6,000 feet high. The side of the mountain collapsed and unleashed a northward debris avalanche and lateral blast that devastated an area of about 230 square miles. This image covers the remains of the volcano itself.


Maps-al-Fresco harken back to the days in cartography when plaster relief models were made, often for the purpose of wall or museum display, or to be photographed for a printed relief map background. Plain in appearance, they show the landscape in it’s simplest, greyscale form.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Monument information: http://www.fs.usda.gov/mountsthelens/


The Olympic Mountains are the result of eons of geologic forces. Original sandstone and shale was compressed and folded by tectonic plates colliding, then was shot through with igneous rocks creating a dome structure. Over time, the dome has been eroded by the incessant flow of moist air from the Pacific Ocean. In the lower elevations the streams erode the landscape, and in the higher elevations the moisture feeds the glaciers, which carve the alpine peaks and valleys. Olympic National Park is dominated by the 7,965 foot Mount Olympus, which has several active glaciers still at work. This image shows the eastern portion of the Park.

ORDER HERE

Maps-al-Fresco harken back to the days in cartography when plaster relief models were made, often for the purpose of wall or museum display, or to be photographed for a printed relief map background. Plain in appearance, they show the landscape in it’s simplest, greyscale form.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/olym/index.htm.


The Olympic Mountains are the result of eons of geologic forces. Original sandstone and shale was compressed and folded by tectonic plates colliding, then was shot through with igneous rocks creating a dome structure. Over time, the dome has been eroded by the incessant flow of moist air from the Pacific Ocean. In the lower elevations the streams erode the landscape, and in the higher elevations the moisture feeds the glaciers, which carve the alpine peaks and valleys. Olympic National Park is dominated by the 7,965 foot Mount Olympus, which has several active glaciers still at work. This image shows the eastern portion of the Park.


Maps-au-Naturel images eliminate the presence of man to show only the natural landscape. These maps are created to be more of an artistic approximation, a feeling, of a particular landscape, rather than an exact rendering of every detail. The actual topography and coloration of the terrain are researched and studied in maps, photos and satellite imagery, and then applied generally to the Maps-au-Naturel image.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Park information: http://www.nps.gov/olym/index.htm


Mount Saint Helens is the youngest of the major Cascade volcanoes – its visible cone was formed entirely during the past 2,200 years. It was a stratovolcano, with steep sided, often symmetrical cones constructed of alternating layers of lava flows, ash, and other volcanic debris, which tend to erupt explosively. The volcano was intermittently active for at least a 26-year span from 1831 to 1857, and perhaps as early as 1800. In the weeks before March 27, 1980 earthquakes began to occur, and on that date Mount Saint Helens erupted, sending ash and steam 6,000 feet high. The side of the mountain collapsed and unleashed a northward debris avalanche and lateral blast that devastated an area of about 230 square miles. This image covers the remains of the volcano itself.


Maps-au-Naturel images eliminate the presence of man to show only the natural landscape. These maps are created to be more of an artistic approximation, a feeling, of a particular landscape, rather than an exact rendering of every detail. The actual topography and coloration of the terrain are researched and studied in maps, photos and satellite imagery, and then applied generally to the Maps-au-Naturel image.

These posters are available on high-quality media (various papers and canvas) using archival inks, and print clearly up to about 34” x 23” (“Large” size). Fulfilled by Zazzle.com. There is a framing option on their website.

Monument information: http://www.fs.usda.gov/mountsthelens/